Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/103341
Title: Understanding complex dynamics of behavioral, neurochemical and transcriptomic changes induced by prolonged chronic unpredictable stress in zebrafish
Authors: Demin, K. A.
Lakstygal, A. M.
Krotova, N. A.
Masharsky, A.
Tagawa, N.
Chernysh, M. V.
Ilyin, N. P.
Taranov, A. S.
Galstyan, D. S.
Derzhavina, K. A.
Levchenko, N. A.
Kolesnikova, T. O.
Mor, M. S.
Vasyutina, M. L.
Efimova, E. V.
Katolikova, N.
Prjibelski, A. D.
Gainetdinov, R. R.
de Abreu, M. S.
Amstislavskaya, T. G.
Strekalova, T.
Kalueff, A. V.
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: Nature Research
Citation: Understanding complex dynamics of behavioral, neurochemical and transcriptomic changes induced by prolonged chronic unpredictable stress in zebrafish / K. A. Demin, A. M. Lakstygal, N. A. Krotova, et al. — DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-75855-3 // Scientific Reports. — 2020. — Vol. 10. — Iss. 1. — 19981.
Abstract: Stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders are widespread, debilitating and often treatment-resistant illnesses that represent an urgent unmet biomedical problem. Animal models of these disorders are widely used to study stress pathogenesis. A more recent and historically less utilized model organism, the zebrafish (Danio rerio), is a valuable tool in stress neuroscience research. Utilizing the 5-week chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model, here we examined brain transcriptomic profiles and complex dynamic behavioral stress responses, as well as neurochemical alterations in adult zebrafish and their correction by chronic antidepressant, fluoxetine, treatment. Overall, CUS induced complex neurochemical and behavioral alterations in zebrafish, including stable anxiety-like behaviors and serotonin metabolism deficits. Chronic fluoxetine (0.1 mg/L for 11 days) rescued most of the observed behavioral and neurochemical responses. Finally, whole-genome brain transcriptomic analyses revealed altered expression of various CNS genes (partially rescued by chronic fluoxetine), including inflammation-, ubiquitin- and arrestin-related genes. Collectively, this supports zebrafish as a valuable translational tool to study stress-related pathogenesis, whose anxiety and serotonergic deficits parallel rodent and clinical studies, and genomic analyses implicate neuroinflammation, structural neuronal remodeling and arrestin/ubiquitin pathways in both stress pathogenesis and its potential therapy. © 2020, The Author(s).
Keywords: ANTIDEPRESSANT AGENT
FLUOXETINE
TRANSCRIPTOME
ANIMAL
ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
ANXIETY
BRAIN
DISEASE MODEL
DRUG EFFECT
DRUG THERAPY
FEMALE
MALE
MENTAL STRESS
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
PHYSIOLOGY
ZEBRA FISH
ANIMALS
ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS
ANXIETY
BEHAVIOR, ANIMAL
BRAIN
DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL
FEMALE
FLUOXETINE
MALE
STRESS, PSYCHOLOGICAL
TRANSCRIPTOME
ZEBRAFISH
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/103341
Access: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
SCOPUS ID: 85096097238
PURE ID: 20125750
04068ce9-2484-4155-a56a-9bd0a5fdc264
ISSN: 20452322
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-75855-3
metadata.dc.description.sponsorship: The research was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (RSF) Grant 19‐15‐00053. KAD is supported by the President of Russia Graduate Fellowship, the Special Rector’s Productivity Fellowship for SPSU PhD Students, and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR) grant 18‐34‐00996. ADP was supported by St. Petersburg University (project ID 51555422). The research team was supported by St. Petersburg State University state budgetary funds (project ID 51130521). AVK is the Chair of the International Zebrafish Neuroscience Research Consortium (ZNRC) and President of the International Stress and Behavior Society (ISBS, www.stress-and-behavior.com) that coordinated this collaborative multi-laboratory project. The consortium provided a collaborative idea exchange platform for this study. It is not considered as an affiliation, and did not fund the study. AVK is supported by the Southwest University Zebrafish Platform Construction Fund. TGA’s research is supported by the budgetary funding for basic research from the Scientific Research Institute of Physiology and Basic Medicine (AAAA-A16-116021010228-0, Novosibirsk, Russia). This study utilized equipment of the Core Facilities Centre “Centre for Molecular and Cell Technologies” of St. Petersburg State University. The funders had no role in the design, analyses, and interpretation of the submitted study, or decision to publish.
RSCF project card: 19-15-00053
Appears in Collections:Научные публикации, проиндексированные в SCOPUS и WoS CC

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
2-s2.0-85096097238.pdf1,97 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.