Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/103253
Title: Is emigration worth the trouble? Satisfaction with life, group identifications, perceived discrimination, and socio-economic status of immigrants and stayers
Authors: Tartakovsky, E.
Patrakov, E.
Nikulina, M.
Issue Date: 2021
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Citation: Tartakovsky E. Is emigration worth the trouble? Satisfaction with life, group identifications, perceived discrimination, and socio-economic status of immigrants and stayers / E. Tartakovsky, E. Patrakov, M. Nikulina. — DOI 10.1016/j.ijintrel.2020.11.012 // International Journal of Intercultural Relations. — 2021. — Vol. 80. — P. 195-205.
Abstract: In the present study, we examined satisfaction with life (SWL), group identifications, perceived discrimination, and socio-economic status among immigrants and stayers. The study had two main objectives: 1) to test the morbidity and salutary hypotheses of immigration by comparing the psycho-social characteristics of immigrants and stayers; 2) to test a resource model of well-being among immigrants and stayers by investigating the effect of different resources and stressors on SWL. The study was conducted using a random representative sample of first-generation immigrants from the Former Soviet Union to Israel (n = 400) and a not-random large and geographically dispersed sample of Jews staying in Russia (n = 935). The comparison of immigrants and stayers revealed that immigration is a mixed blessing, salutary in some aspects and onerous in others. In general, immigrants were more satisfied with their life than stayers. In addition, identification with the country of residence was stronger among immigrants than stayers. However, immigrants reported a higher level of perceived discrimination, and their socio-economic status was lower than that of stayers. Socio-economic status, identification with the country of residence, and perceived discrimination were directly connected to SWL among immigrants and stayers. In addition, among stayers, identification with the ethnic minority group was connected to SWL, while among immigrants, identification with the country of origin was not connected to SWL. Socio-economic status and perceived discrimination also affected SWL indirectly, through their connections to identification with the country of residence among immigrants and stayers and through their connection to ethnic identification among stayers. © 2020 Elsevier Ltd
Keywords: GROUP IDENTIFICATIONS
IMMIGRANTS AND STAYERS
MORBIDITY AND SALUTARY IMMIGRATION HYPOTHESES
PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION
SATISFACTION WITH LIFE
THE REJECTION-DISIDENTIFICATION AND REJECTION-IDENTIFICATION MODELS
ARTICLE
CONTROLLED STUDY
HUMAN
IMMIGRANT
IMMIGRATION
ISRAEL
JEW
MAJOR CLINICAL STUDY
MORBIDITY
SATISFACTION
SOCIAL STATUS
USSR
WELLBEING
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/103253
Access: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
SCOPUS ID: 85097228944
PURE ID: 20217315
69590531-90b6-4d20-a5b0-a93c92a4ea55
ISSN: 1471767
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijintrel.2020.11.012
metadata.dc.description.sponsorship: The study was partly supported by a grant from Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem . Israel Science Foundation Grant 244/15 .
Appears in Collections:Научные публикации, проиндексированные в SCOPUS и WoS CC

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