Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/103113
Title: The invasive longhorn beetle Xylotrechus chinensis, pest of mulberries, in Europe: Study on its local spread and efficacy of abamectin control
Authors: Sarto, I, Monteys, V.
Ribes, A. C.
Savin, I.
Issue Date: 2021
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: The invasive longhorn beetle Xylotrechus chinensis, pest of mulberries, in Europe: Study on its local spread and efficacy of abamectin control / I. Sarto, V. Monteys, A. C. Ribes, et al. — DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0245527 // PLoS ONE. — 2021. — Vol. 16. — Iss. 1 January. — e0245527.
Abstract: The invasive wasp-mimicking Tiger Longicorn Beetle, Xylotrechus chinensis, a potentially lethal pest of mulberry trees (Moraceae: Morus sp.), was first reported in Europe in 2018, although its colonization and establishment were estimated to have occurred during the year 2012 or earlier. In Catalonia the infestation spread from four towns and 44.1 km2 in 2018 to 12 towns and 378.1 km2 in 2020; in the studied town of Barberà del Vallès, infested trees rose from 16.21% in February 2016 to 59.29% in December 2018. Human safety in public parks and avenues is a concern, as beetle infestation increases the risk of falling branches. The main objective of this study was to evaluate how the infestation progresses over time, with and without abamectin treatment, and provide insights into female egg-laying preferences. Such knowledge helps contribute to management efforts to reduce expansion of the range of beetle infestation. Our statistical analysis shows that females prefer laying eggs on larger trees, on the highest part of trunks and on the crown base (this being more preferred than the trunk), and they do so on warmer, SW orientations rather than those facing N, NW and E. Emergence holes and gallery slits predict the spreading of infestations to new trees. An abamectin treatment (trunk injection) carried out at the end of April significantly reduced the number of new infestation. However, for maximum insecticide efficiency, the best time for treating with abamectin would be from mid-July to mid-August, when newly hatched larvae begin feeding on the phloem. Copyright: © 2021 Sarto i Monteys et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: ABAMECTIN
ABAMECTIN
INSECTICIDE
IVERMECTIN
ARTICLE
BEETLE
CONTROLLED STUDY
EGG LAYING
EUROPE
FEEDING
KNOWLEDGE
LARVA
MORUS
NONHUMAN
PEST CONTROL
PHLOEM
TREE TRUNK
WARMING
XYLOTRECHUS CHINENSIS
ANATOMY AND HISTOLOGY
ANIMAL
GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT AND AGING
INSECT CONTROL
INTRODUCED SPECIES
ANIMALS
COLEOPTERA
EUROPE
INSECT CONTROL
INSECTICIDES
INTRODUCED SPECIES
IVERMECTIN
MORUS
OUTCOME ASSESSMENT, HEALTH CARE
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/103113
Access: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
SCOPUS ID: 85100290827
PURE ID: 20903109
ddf17661-ebed-4c43-94b5-d4bd215dc851
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0245527
Appears in Collections:Научные публикации, проиндексированные в SCOPUS и WoS CC

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