Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/102131
Title: Measuring the terminal heights of bolides to understand the atmospheric flight of large asteroidal fragments
Authors: Moreno-Ibáñez, M.
Gritsevich, M.
Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Citation: Moreno-Ibáñez M. Measuring the terminal heights of bolides to understand the atmospheric flight of large asteroidal fragments / M. Moreno-Ibáñez, M. Gritsevich, J. M. Trigo-Rodríguez. — DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-46179-3_7 // Astrophysics and Space Science Proceedings. — 2017. — Vol. 46. — P. 129-151.
Abstract: The extent of penetration into the Earth’s atmosphere of a meteoroid is defined by the point where its kinetic energy is no longer sufficient to produce luminosity. For most of the cases this is the point where the meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere due to ablation process and dynamic pressure during flight. However, some of these bodies have particular physical properties (bigger size, higher bulk strength, etc.) or favorable flight conditions (lower entry velocity or/and a convenient trajectory slope, etc.) that allow them to become a meteoritedropper and reach the ground. In both cases, we define the end of the luminous path of the trajectory as the terminal height or end height. Thus, the end point shows the amount of deceleration till the final braking. We thus assume that the ability of a fireball to produce meteorites is directly related to its terminal height. Previous studies have discussed the likely relationship between fireball atmospheric flight properties and the terminal height. Most of these studies require the knowledge of a set of properties and physical variables which cannot be determined with sufficient accuracy from ground-based observations. The recently validated dimensionless methodology offers a new approach to this problem. All the unknowns can be reduced to only two parameters which are easily derived from observations. Despite the calculation of the analytic solution of the equations of motion is not trivial, some simplifications are admitted. Here, we describe the best performance range and the errors associated with these simplifications. We discuss how terminal heights depend on two or three variables that are easily retrieved from the recordings, provided at least three trajectory (h, v) points. Additionally, we review the importance of terminal heights, and the way they have been estimated in previous studies. Finally we discuss a new approach for calculating terminal heights. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017.
Keywords: ASTEROIDS
EQUATIONS OF MOTION
KINETIC ENERGY
KINETICS
TRAJECTORIES
ANALYTIC SOLUTION
ATMOSPHERIC FLIGHT
DYNAMIC PRESSURES
ENTRY VELOCITY
FLIGHT CONDITIONS
GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS
NEW APPROACHES
PHYSICAL VARIABLES
EARTH ATMOSPHERE
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/102131
Access: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
SCOPUS ID: 85018643081
PURE ID: 1811242
3a545b4e-0bec-41a2-94bd-3d1c5882a73d
ISSN: 15706591
ISBN: 9783319461786
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-46179-3_7
Appears in Collections:Научные публикации, проиндексированные в SCOPUS и WoS CC

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