Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/101790
Title: Animal models of major depressive disorder and the implications for drug discovery and development
Authors: Demin, K. A.
Sysoev, M.
Chernysh, M. V.
Savva, A. K.
Koshiba, M.
Wappler-Guzzetta, E. A.
Song, C.
De Abreu, M. S.
Leonard, B.
Parker, M. O.
Harvey, B. H.
Tian, L.
Vasar, E.
Strekalova, T.
Amstislavskaya, T. G.
Volgin, A. D.
Alpyshov, E. T.
Wang, D.
Kalueff, A. V.
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Taylor and Francis Ltd
Citation: Animal models of major depressive disorder and the implications for drug discovery and development / K. A. Demin, M. Sysoev, M. V. Chernysh, et al. — DOI 10.1080/17460441.2019.1575360 // Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery. — 2019. — Vol. 14. — Iss. 4. — P. 365-378.
Abstract: Introduction: Depression is a highly debilitating psychiatric disorder that affects the global population and causes severe disabilities and suicide. Depression pathogenesis remains poorly understood, and the disorder is often treatment-resistant and recurrent, necessitating the development of novel therapies, models and concepts in this field. Areas covered: Animal models are indispensable for translational biological psychiatry, and markedly advance the study of depression. Novel approaches continuously emerge that may help untangle the disorder heterogeneity and unclear categories of disease classification systems. Some of these approaches include widening the spectrum of model species used for translational research, using a broader range of test paradigms, exploring new pathogenic pathways and biomarkers, and focusing more closely on processes beyond neural cells (e.g. glial, inflammatory and metabolic deficits). Expert opinion: Dividing the core symptoms into easily translatable, evolutionarily conserved phenotypes is an effective way to reevaluate current depression modeling. Conceptually novel approaches based on the endophenotype paradigm, cross-species trait genetics and ‘domain interplay concept’, as well as using a wider spectrum of model organisms and target systems will enhance experimental modeling of depression and antidepressant drug discovery. © 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Keywords: ANIMAL MODELING
DEPRESSION
ENDOPHENOTYPE
MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER
PATHOGENESIS
ANIMAL MODEL
DRUG DEVELOPMENT
HUMAN
MAJOR DEPRESSION
NONHUMAN
PATHOGENESIS
PRIORITY JOURNAL
REVIEW
ANIMAL
DISEASE MODEL
DRUG DEVELOPMENT
MAJOR DEPRESSION
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
PROCEDURES
TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH
ANTIDEPRESSANT AGENT
ANIMALS
ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS
DEPRESSIVE DISORDER, MAJOR
DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL
DRUG DEVELOPMENT
DRUG DISCOVERY
HUMANS
TRANSLATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/101790
Access: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
SCOPUS ID: 85062993078
PURE ID: 9180974
0074e887-58fd-4f3f-917c-31814dedb789
ISSN: 17460441
DOI: 10.1080/17460441.2019.1575360
Appears in Collections:Научные публикации, проиндексированные в SCOPUS и WoS CC

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
2-s2.0-85062993078.pdf819,54 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.