Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/101484
Title: Population dynamics and range shifts of moose (Alces alces) during the Late Quaternary
Authors: Meiri, M.
Lister, A.
Kosintsev, P.
Zazula, G.
Barnes, I.
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Citation: Population dynamics and range shifts of moose (Alces alces) during the Late Quaternary / M. Meiri, A. Lister, P. Kosintsev, et al. — DOI 10.1111/jbi.13935 // Journal of Biogeography. — 2020. — Vol. 47. — Iss. 10. — P. 2223-2234.
Abstract: Aim: Late Quaternary climate oscillations had major impacts on species distributions and abundances across the northern Holarctic. While many large mammals in this region went extinct towards the end of the Quaternary, some species survived and flourished. Here, we examine population dynamics and range shifts of one of the most widely distributed of these, the moose (Alces alces). Location: Northern Holarctic. Taxon: Moose (A. alces). Methods: We collected samples of modern and ancient moose from across their present and former range. We assessed their phylogeographical relations using part of the mitochondrial DNA in conjunction with radiocarbon dating to investigate the history of A. alces during the last glacial. Results: This species has a relatively shallow history, with the most recent common ancestor estimated at ca. 150–50 kyr. Ancient samples corroborate that its region of greatest diversity is in east Asia, supporting proposals that this is the region of origin of all extant moose. Both eastern and western haplogroups occur in the Ural Mountains during the last glacial period, implying a broader contact zone than previously proposed. It seems that this species went extinct over much of its northern range during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and recolonized the region with climate warming beginning around 15,000 yr bp. The post-LGM expansion included a movement from northeast Siberia to North America via Beringia, although the northeast Siberian source population is not the one currently occupying that area. Main conclusions: Moose are a relatively recently evolved species but have had a dynamic history. As a large-bodied subarctic browsing species, they were seemingly confined to refugia during full-glacial periods and expanded their range northwards when the boreal forest returned after the LGM. The main modern phylogeographical division is ancient, though its boundary has not remained constant. Moose population expansion into America was roughly synchronous with human and red deer expansion. © 2020 The Authors. Journal of Biogeography published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Keywords: ALCES ALCES
ANCIENT DNA
LAST GLACIAL MAXIMUM
MITOCHONDRIAL DNA
MOOSE
QUATERNARY
COMMON ANCESTRY
DEER
EXTINCTION
GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION
HOLARCTIC REGION
LAST GLACIAL
LAST GLACIAL MAXIMUM
OSCILLATION
PHYLOGEOGRAPHY
POPULATION DYNAMICS
QUATERNARY
RADIOCARBON DATING
RANGE EXPANSION
RANGE SIZE
SURVIVAL
BERING ISLAND
FAR EAST
KAMCHATKA
KOMANDORSKI ISLANDS
NORTH AMERICA
RUSSIAN FEDERATION
SIBERIA
URALS
ALCES ALCES
CERVUS ELAPHUS
MAMMALIA
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/101484
Access: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
SCOPUS ID: 85088438725
PURE ID: 14155592
e900323c-4848-4bc9-9b0b-a720587f4c9c
ISSN: 3050270
DOI: 10.1111/jbi.13935
metadata.dc.description.sponsorship: We warmly thank the following museums, curators and people for access to samples: the late Andrei Sher, Severtsov Institute, Moscow; Andy Currant, Natural History Museum, London; Alfred Gardner, Smithsonian, Washington DC; R. Dale Guthrie, University of Alaska, Fairbanks; John de Vos, National Museum of Natural History (Naturalis), Leiden; Eileen Westwig, American Museum of Natural History, NY; Fyodor Shidlovsky, Ice-Age Museum, Moscow; Tong Haowen, Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Paleoanthropology, Beijing; Mammoth Museum, Yakutsk; Geological Museum, Yakutsk; Paleontological Institute, Moscow; Royal Alberta Museum, Edmonton; Zoological Institute, Saint Petersburg; Museum of the Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology, Ekaterinburg. We thank our Yukon First Nation research partners for their continued support for our work on the ice age fossils of Yukon Territory. We are grateful to the placer gold mining community and the Tr'ond?k Hw?ch'in First Nation for their continued support and partnership with our research in the Klondike goldfields region; and the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation for their collaboration with research in the Old Crow region. We would also like to thank Shai Meiri for help in drawing the map and useful discussion, Tony Stuart for access to radiocarbon dates, and Iris van Pijlen for laboratory assistance. This research was funded by NERC grant NE/G00269X/1 through the European Union FP7 ERA-NET program BiodivERsA. Funding for AMS dating was provided through NERC/AHRC/ORAU Grant NF/2008/2/15.
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