Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/101393
Title: Offensive behavior, striatal glutamate metabolites, and limbic–hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal responses to stress in chronic anxiety
Authors: Ullmann, E.
Chrousos, G.
Perry, S. W.
Wong, M. -L.
Licinio, J.
Bornstein, S. R.
Tseilikman, O.
Komelkova, M.
Lapshin, M. S.
Vasilyeva, M.
Zavjalov, E.
Shevelev, O.
Khotskin, N.
Koncevaya, G.
Khotskina, A. S.
Moshkin, M.
Cherkasova, O.
Sarapultsev, A.
Ibragimov, R.
Kritsky, I.
Fegert, J. M.
Tseilikman, V.
Yehuda, R.
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: MDPI AG
Citation: Offensive behavior, striatal glutamate metabolites, and limbic–hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal responses to stress in chronic anxiety / E. Ullmann, G. Chrousos, S. W. Perry, et al. — DOI 10.3390/ijms21207440 // International Journal of Molecular Sciences. — 2020. — Vol. 21. — Iss. 20. — P. 1-16. — 7440.
Abstract: Variations in anxiety-related behavior are associated with individual allostatic set-points in chronically stressed rats. Actively offensive rats with the externalizing indicators of sniffling and climbing the stimulus and material tearing during 10 days of predator scent stress had reduced plasma corticosterone, increased striatal glutamate metabolites, and increased adrenal 11-dehydrocorticosterone content compared to passively defensive rats with the internalizing indicators of freezing and grooming, as well as to controls without any behavioral changes. These findings suggest that rats that display active offensive activity in response to stress develop anxiety associated with decreased allostatic set-points and increased resistance to stress. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Keywords: CHRONIC STRESS
CPTSD
GLUTAMATE
STRIATUM
DEHYDROCORTICOSTERONE
GLUTAMIC ACID
BIOLOGICAL MARKER
GLUTAMIC ACID
HORMONE
AGGRESSION
ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
ANIMAL EXPERIMENT
ANXIETY
ARTICLE
BEHAVIOR CHANGE
CLIMBING
CONTROLLED STUDY
CORTICOSTERONE BLOOD LEVEL
FEMALE
FREEZING
GROOMING
HYPOTHALAMUS HYPOPHYSIS ADRENAL SYSTEM
LIMBIC SYSTEM
METABOLITE
NONHUMAN
PREDATOR
RAT
STIMULUS
STRESS
STRIATE CORTEX
ANIMAL
ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
ANXIETY
CORPUS STRIATUM
DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING
DISEASE MODEL
ETIOLOGY
HYPOPHYSIS ADRENAL SYSTEM
HYPOTHALAMUS
LIMBIC SYSTEM
MALE
MAZE TEST
MENTAL STRESS
METABOLISM
NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS
PSYCHOLOGY
SPECTROSCOPY
ANIMALS
ANXIETY
BEHAVIOR, ANIMAL
BIOMARKERS
CORPUS STRIATUM
DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL
GLUTAMIC ACID
HORMONES
HYPOTHALAMUS
LIMBIC SYSTEM
MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING
MALE
MAZE LEARNING
PITUITARY-ADRENAL SYSTEM
RATS
SPECTRUM ANALYSIS
STRESS, PHYSIOLOGICAL
STRESS, PSYCHOLOGICAL
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/101393
Access: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
SCOPUS ID: 85092372750
PURE ID: 14158754
e0ae121c-7dcb-4a8f-a6c0-d0c60cfbad9c
ISSN: 16616596
DOI: 10.3390/ijms21207440
metadata.dc.description.sponsorship: The Russian Science Foundation (grant № 17-15-013418) supported this study. This was supported in part by the contracts of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation with South Ural State University (17.7255.2017/8.9) and Institute of Immunology and Physiology (AAAA-A18-118020690020-1). The work was furthermore supported by institutional funds from the State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University. This work is part of the TransCampus project between TU Dresden and King’s College London and was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (5101CX001219) and the U.S. Department of Defense (W81XWH-16-1-0773).
RSCF project card: 17-15-013418
Appears in Collections:Научные публикации, проиндексированные в SCOPUS и WoS CC

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