Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/101388
Title: Origins and spatial distribution of non-pure sulfate particles (Nsps) in the stratosphere detected by the balloon-borne light optical aerosols counter (loac)
Authors: Renard, J. -B.
Berthet, G.
Levasseur-Regourd, A. -C.
Beresnev, S.
Miffre, A.
Rairoux, P.
Vignelles, D.
Jégou, F.
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: MDPI AG
Citation: Origins and spatial distribution of non-pure sulfate particles (Nsps) in the stratosphere detected by the balloon-borne light optical aerosols counter (loac) / J. -B. Renard, G. Berthet, A. -C. Levasseur-Regourd, et al. — DOI 10.3390/atmos11101031 // Atmosphere. — 2020. — Vol. 11. — Iss. 10. — 1031.
Abstract: While water and sulfuric acid droplets are the main component of stratospheric aerosols, measurements performed for about 30 years have shown that non-sulfate particles (NSPs) are also present. Such particles, released from the Earth mainly through volcanic eruptions, pollution or biomass burning, or coming from space, present a wide variety of compositions, sizes, and shapes. To better understand the origin of NSPs, we have performed measurements with the Light Optical Aerosol Counter (LOAC) during 151 flights under weather balloons in the 2013–2019 period reaching altitudes up to 35 km. Coupled with previous counting measurements conducted over the 2004–2011 period, the LOAC measurements indicate the presence of stratospheric layers of enhanced concentrations associated with NSPs, with a bimodal vertical repartition ranging between 17 and 30 km altitude. Such enhancements are not correlated with permanent meteor shower events. They may be linked to dynamical and photophoretic effects lifting and sustaining particles coming from the Earth. Besides, large particles, up to several tens of µm, were detected and present decreasing concentrations with increasing altitudes. All these particles can originate from Earth but also from meteoroid disintegrations and from the interplanetary dust cloud and comets. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Keywords: BALLOON
COUNTING
NON-SULFATE STRATOSPHERIC AEROSOLS
TYPOLOGY
AEROSOLS
EARTH (PLANET)
SULFUR COMPOUNDS
VOLCANOES
BIOMASS-BURNING
INTERPLANETARY DUST
LARGE PARTICLES
STRATOSPHERIC AEROSOLS
SULFATE PARTICLES
VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS
METEOROLOGICAL BALLOONS
AEROSOL
BALLOON OBSERVATION
MEASUREMENT METHOD
PARTICULATE MATTER
POINT SOURCE
SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION
STRATOSPHERE
SULFATE
TYPOLOGY
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/101388
Access: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
SCOPUS ID: 85092711590
PURE ID: 14155332
786cc0cd-92d1-45ec-a45b-d9ca9b115cda
ISSN: 20734433
DOI: 10.3390/atmos11101031
metadata.dc.description.sponsorship: The LOAC instruments were funded by the French Labex “Étude des géofluides et des VOLatils–Terre, Atmosphère et Interfaces–Ressources et Environnement” (VOLTAIRE) (ANR-10-LABX-100-01) managed by the University of Orleans. The STAC and LOAC flights were funded by the French Space Agency CNES. We want to thank the CNES balloons launching team at Aire sur l’Adour, the MeteoModem Company for the flight for Ury (France), and Nelson Bègue and the LACy for the flights at Ile de la Réunion. We want to thank Marie-Agnès Courty for information concerning the local production of nanocomposite in the atmosphere, Andrei Vedernikov for fruitful discussion, the reviewers for their useful comments, and finally CNES for its support of the Rosetta mission and its scientific data analysis. Sergey Beresnev wants to thank the Ministry of Science and Higher Education of the Russian Federation, project № FEUZ-2020-0057.
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