Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/111589
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dc.contributor.authorIvlevs, A.en
dc.contributor.authorNikolova, M.en
dc.contributor.authorPopova, O.en
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-12T08:19:26Z-
dc.date.available2022-05-12T08:19:26Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationIvlevs A. Former Communist Party Membership and Present-day Entrepreneurship / A. Ivlevs, M. Nikolova, O. Popova // Small Business Economics. — 2021. — Vol. 57. — Iss. 4. — P. 1783-1800.en
dc.identifier.issn0921-898X-
dc.identifier.otherAll Open Access, Hybrid Gold, Green3
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10995/111589-
dc.description.abstractAfter the collapse of communism in Central and Eastern Europe, former party members were particularly likely to start businesses and become entrepreneurs. What remains unclear, however, is whether this entrepreneurial activity was driven by the resources, information, and opportunities provided by former party membership or because individuals with specific individual attributes were more likely to become Communist cadres (self-selection). This study is the first to separate the causal effect of former Communist party membership from self-selection. Using individual-level Life in Transition-III survey data and a control function approach, we find that former Communist party membership has facilitated business set-up but not business longevity in Central and Eastern European countries. We also show that people who joined the former ruling party had fewer of the traits associated with entrepreneurship such as unobservable personality traits, ability, motivation, and entrepreneurial aptitude, and as such were negatively self-selected. We show that former Communist party membership still matters for business practices, business ethics, and the nature of doing business in transition economies. © 2020, The Author(s).en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are thankful to two anonymous referees and the Associate Editor László Szerb, as well as Frank Fossen, Michael Wyrwich, Aard Groen, Olga Belousova, Andrew Austin, Ira N. Gang, and participants of the University of Groningen’s Centre of Entrepreneurship Research Seminar for valuable comments and suggestions. Popova acknowledges the support from Russian Science Foundation grant No. 19-18-00262.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren1
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/RSF//19-18-00262en
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessen
dc.sourceSmall Bus. Econ.2
dc.sourceSmall Business Economicsen
dc.subjectCENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEen
dc.subjectCOMMUNIST PARTYen
dc.subjectELITE NETWORKSen
dc.subjectENTREPRENEURSHIPen
dc.subjectPOST-SOCIALIST COUNTRIESen
dc.titleFormer Communist Party Membership and Present-day Entrepreneurshipen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleen
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionen
dc.identifier.scopus85086849826-
local.contributor.employeeIvlevs, A., Bristol Business School, University of the West of England (UWE Bristol), Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY, United Kingdom, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), Bonn, Germany; Nikolova, M., Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), Bonn, Germany, Faculty of Economics and Business, Global Economics and Management, University of Groningen, Nettelbosje 2, Groningen, 9747 AE, Netherlands, The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC, United States, Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4, Regensburg, 93047, Germany; Popova, O., Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4, Regensburg, 93047, Germany, CERGE-EI, a joint workplace of Charles University and the Economics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic, Graduate School of Economics and Management, Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg, Russian Federationen
local.description.firstpage1783-
local.description.lastpage1800-
local.issue4-
local.volume57-
local.contributor.departmentBristol Business School, University of the West of England (UWE Bristol), Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY, United Kingdom; Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), Bonn, Germany; Faculty of Economics and Business, Global Economics and Management, University of Groningen, Nettelbosje 2, Groningen, 9747 AE, Netherlands; The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC, United States; Leibniz Institute for East and Southeast European Studies (IOS), Landshuter Str. 4, Regensburg, 93047, Germany; CERGE-EI, a joint workplace of Charles University and the Economics Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic; Graduate School of Economics and Management, Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg, Russian Federationen
local.identifier.pure29073560-
local.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85086849826-
local.fund.rsf19-18-00262-
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