Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/102089
Title: Urban infant mortality and religion at the end of the nineteenth and in the early twentieth century: the case of Ekaterinburg, Russia
Authors: Glavatskaya, E.
Borovik, J.
Thorvaldsen, G.
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Routledge
Citation: Glavatskaya E. Urban infant mortality and religion at the end of the nineteenth and in the early twentieth century: the case of Ekaterinburg, Russia / E. Glavatskaya, J. Borovik, G. Thorvaldsen. — DOI 10.1080/1081602X.2017.1341845 // History of the Family. — 2018. — Vol. 23. — Iss. 1. — P. 135-153.
Abstract: Modern demographers analyse regional and other infant mortality differentials as important factors behind the current life expectancy of Russian citizens. Historically, however, the Russian Empire is simply displayed as one block with high infant mortality rates. Also with respect to cultural background factors, Russia is often perceived as religiously homogeneous with the Orthodox Church dominating the country. In reality, Russia has a long history of coexisting religious traditions. This includes both provinces with a majority of Catholics, Muslims, Buddhists or shamanistic populations as well as territories characterized by religious diversity and significant minority religions. Our project studies minority religious groups in the Urals, a province by the Ural Mountains stretching into Asia. While no territory can claim to be truly representative of this mega-country, we believe that this centrally located province is well suited to show some of the Russian variety, including differential infant mortality among the followers of minority religions, which is the topic of this article. We employ church record microdata to study Catholics, Jews and Old Believers in the main metal-producing city of Ekaterinburg. © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Keywords: HISTORICAL DEMOGRAPHY
INFANT MORTALITY
MINORITIES
RELIGION
RUSSIAN EMPIRE
URALS
ASIA
BUDDHIST
CATHOLIC
DEMOGRAPHY
HUMAN
INFANT MORTALITY
JEW
MUSLIM
RELIGION
RUSSIAN FEDERATION
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10995/102089
Access: info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
SCOPUS ID: 85026884362
PURE ID: 6426549
d64820c4-2607-432c-b09a-d994f1594fe9
ISSN: 1081602X
DOI: 10.1080/1081602X.2017.1341845
Appears in Collections:Научные публикации, проиндексированные в SCOPUS и WoS CC

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